Nov 3, 2018

Weekend Project: Take a Kinetic Ride on this 3D Printed Rainbow Roller Coaster

Looking for a way to keep your eyes occupied during the chilly Winter season? This Rainbow Roller Coaster, created by designer Dominik Cisar, is a kinetic sculpture that will send your mind for a spin.

3D printing technology is capable of producing incredibly complex designs, allowing us to create structures that were previously unachievable with traditional fabrication techniques. For instance, designers are now better able to develop intricate 3D printed structures that utilize kinetic motion.
This style of architecture feature parts that allow the structure to move without reducing the overall structural integrity. Aside from the mechanical benefits of kinetic structures, they also tend to look pretty darn cool.
The Rainbow Roller Coaster is one of the most visually striking examples of a 3D printed kinetic structure that we’ve seen. Created by designer Dominik Cisar, the structure utilizes a large amount of vibrant 3D printed blades to cycle through endless gradients of color.
Resembling the famous racetrack from the classic video game Mario Kart, you can think of this structure as a Rainbow Road for your eyes to race around. This 3D printing project was recently shared online, and now you can create one on your own!

But beware, if you decide to make this Rainbow Roller Coaster, chances are you’ll spend hours staring in awe at the spectacular kinetic motion. Ready to proceed? Let’s take a closer look at this vibrant Weekend Project.

3D Printed Rainbow Roller Coaster What You Need & How to Build it

If you’re planning to create your own rainbow-inspired kinetic sculpture, be prepared to do a lot of printing. The STL files are available to download for $5 from the 3D model repository Cults. The designer suggests using support structures for the stand and mechanics, but you can add them elsewhere at your own discretion.

This 3D printed Rainbow Roller Coaster is comprised of numerous 3D printed parts. For instance, both the Blade Gear and Blade models need to be printed 42 times each. Of course, part of what makes this structure look so cool is the vibrant mixture of colors. If you don’t have an array of colorful filaments at your disposal, it might be easier to use paint to achieve the rainbow effect.

The kinetic movement is controlled by a single motor. According to Cisar, he uses a NEMA17 40Ncm stepper motor. He had to trim a bit of the shaft off in order to fit it into the assembly. You’ll also need some super glue to put all of the 3D printed parts together. To get a better idea of how to put this contraption together, check out the assembly diagram below:

As you can see, this 3D printed kinetic sculpture requires a lot of print time and a relatively daunting assembly process. However, once you’ve finished building this project, you’ll be left with a highly entertaining and aesthetically pleasing roller coaster that will capture your attention for hours on end.

If you want to download the files or learn more about this project, head on over to Cults.

License: The text of "Weekend Project: Take a Kinetic Ride on this 3D Printed Rainbow Roller Coaster" by All3DP is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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